Taittiriya Upanishad

Translated by A. Mahadeva Sastri

Page 5

Book 3

Lesson 1

May Brahman protect us both!

May He give us both to enjoy!

Efficiency may we both attain!

Effective may our study prove!

Hate may we not (each other) at all!

Om! Peace! Peace! Peace!

1. Bhrigu, theat son of Varuna, approached Varuna, his father, saying,"Sir, teach me Brahman.”

2. To him he said this: Food life, sight, hearing, mind, speech.

3. To him, verily, he said: Whence indeed these beings are born; whereby, when born, they live; wherein, when departing, they enter; That seek thou to know; That is Brahman.

4. He resorted to devotion.

5. He, having practiced devotion, —

Lesson 2

1. That food was Brahman he concluded. From food indeed are these beings verily born; by food, when born, do they live; into food, do they, when departing, enter.

2. That having known, again,verily, did he approach Varunathe father, saying “Sir, teach me Brahman.”

3. To him said (Varuna): By devotion, Brahman seek thou to know. Devotion is Brahman.

4. He resorted to devotion.

5. He, having practiced devotion, —

Lesson 3

1. That life was Brahman, he concluded. From life indeed are these beings verily born; by life, when born, do they live; into life do they, when departing, enter.

2. That having known, again, verily, did he approach Varuna, the father, saying, “Sir, teach me Brahman.”

3. To him said (Varuna): By devotion, Brahman seek thou to know. Devotion is Brahman.

4. He resorted to devotion.

5. Having practised devotion, —

Lesson 4

1. That manas was Brahman, he concluded. From manas, indeed, are these beings verily born; by manas, when born, do they live; into manas do they, when departing, enter.

2. That having known, again, verily, did he approach Varuna, the father, saying “Sir, teach me Brahman.”

3. To him said (Varuna): By devotion, Brahman seek thou to know. Devotion is Brahman.

4. He resorted to devotion.

5. He having practised devotion, —

Lesson 5

1. That intelligence was Brahman he concluded. From intelligence, indeed, are these beings verily born; by intelligence, when born, do they live; into intelligence do they, when departing, enter.

2. That having known, again, verily, did he approach Varuna, the father, saying “Sir, teach me Brahman.”

3. To him said (Varuna): By devotion, Brahman seek thou to know. Devotion is Brahman.

4. He resorted to devotion.

5. He, having practised devotion, —

Lesson 6

1. That Bliss was Brahman, he concluded. From Bliss, indeed, are these things verily born; by Bliss, when born, do they live; into Bliss do they, when departing, enter.

2. This wisdom of Bhrigu and Varuna is established in the Supreme Heaven.

3. Whoso thus knows is firmly established.

4. Possessor of food and eater of food he becomes. Great he becomes by progeny, by cattle, by spiritual lustre, great by fame.

Lesson 7

1. He shall not condemn food; that shall be his vow.

2. Life, verily, is food, the body the eater of food. In life the body is set; life is set in the body. Thus food is set in food.

3. Whoso knows that thus food is set in food, he is settled; possessor of food and food-eater he becomes. Great he becomes by progeny, by cattle, by spiritual lustre; great by fame.

Lesson 8

1. He shall not abandon food; that his vow.

2. Water verily is food, fire the food-eater. In water is fire set; water is set in fire. Thus food is set in food.

3. Whoso knows that thus food is set in food, he is settled; possessor of food and food-eater he becomes. Great he becomes by progeny, by cattle, by spiritual lustre; great by fame.

Lesson 9

1. He shall make food plentiful; that is his vow.

2. Earth verily is food; ether the food-eater. In earth is ether set; earth is set in ether. Thus food is set in food.

3. Whoso knows that thus food is set in food, he is settled; possessor food and food-eater he becomes. Great he becomes by progeny, by cattle, by spiritual lustre; great by fame.

Lesson 10

1. None, as to his lodging, he shall turn away: that his vow.

2. Therefore, by whatever means, he should earn much food.

3. Food is prepared for him, — they say.

4. This food, verily, being prepared at the highest, at the highest is food ready for him. This food, verily, being prepared at the middle, at the middle is food ready for him. This food, veryly, being prepared at the lowest, at the lowest isfood ready for him, — (for him) who thus knows.

5. As safety in speech, as gain and safety in prana and apana, as action in the hands, as motion in the feet, as discharge in the anus: such are contemplations in man.

6. Next as to those referring to Devas: as satisfaction in the rain, as strength in the lightning, as fame in cattle, as light in the stars, as procreation, the immortal, and joy in the generative organ, as all in the akasa.

7. Let him contemplate That as support, he becomes well-supported. Let him contemplate That as great, he becomes great. Let him contemplate That as thought, he becomes thoughtful. Let him contemplate That as homage, to him desires pay homage. Let him contemplate That as the Supreme, possessed of supremacy he becomes. Let him contemplate That as Brahman’s destructive agent, around him die his hateful rivals, and thoses rivals whom he does not like.

8. And this one who is in the man, and that one who is in the Sun, He is one.

9. He who thus knows, departing from this world and attaining this Annamaya self, then attaining this Pranamaya self, then attaining this Manomaya self, then attaining this Vijnanamaya self, then attaining this Anandamaya self, traversing these worlds, having the food he likes, taking the form he likes, this song singing he sits.

10. Oh! Oh! Oh! I am food, I food, I food! I food-eater, I food-eater, I food-eater! I am the combining agent, I am the combining agent, I am the combining agent. I am the First-born of the existence! Prior to gods, the centre of the immortal. Whoso giveth me, he surely doth thus save. I, the food, eat him who eats food. I the whole being destroy. Light, like the sun!

11. Whoso thus knows. Such is the Upanishad.

THUS ENDS THIS UPANISHAD

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This page was published on May 13, 2000 and last revised on July 8, 2017.


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