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Nothing Existed Except the Eyes of the Maharshi by N.R. Krishnamurti Aiyer. Oct. 29, 2001

Who Are You? An Interview With Papaji by Jeff Greenwald. Oct. 24, 2001

An Interview with Byron Katie by Sunny Massad. Oct. 23, 2001

An Interview with Douglas Harding by Kriben Pillay. Oct. 21, 2001

The Nectar of Immortality by Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj. Oct. 18, 2001

The Power of the Presence Part Two by David Godman. Oct. 15, 2001

The Quintessence of My Teaching
by Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj. Oct. 3, 2001

Interview With David Godman. Sept. 28, 2001

The Power of the Presence Part One by David Godman. Sept. 28, 2001

Nothing Ever Happened Volume 1 by David Godman. Sept. 23, 2001

Collision with the Infinite by Suzanne Segal. Sept. 22, 2001

Lilly of the Valley, the Bright and Morning Star by Charlie Hopkins. August 9, 2001


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Our email address is editor @realization.org.

Copyright 2001 Realization.org.

 

 
 
  EXPERIENCE
 

Grand Central Station

By GREG GOODE

 

This wonderful description of awakening appeared as a letter on the Nonduality Salon mailing list on December 9, 1999. Somebody had asked the author, "To what do you attend?" This was his reply.


FOR ME, ATTENDING is no more.

But years ago, there was lots and lots of attending. It was like this: before and during spiritual seeking, I wasn't badly suffering or in pain or unhappy with my life or stuck in dysfunctional patterns. Instead, it was a deep sense of loneliness, alienation, lack of fulfillment, and a strong yearning from the heart and mind to know "What is it all about? What is the purpose of life? What happens after? What are all these mystical truths that are spoken of? Where is fulfillment to be found?"

In a nutshell, the paths for me were two: devotional (bhakti and karma yoga) through Born-Again Pentecostal Christianity; then, later, a wide search and deep inquiry that was primarily intellectual, but felt at the heart and body levels as well. This message is about the second part.

Lots of what follows may seem quite heady and intellectual, but believe me, the heart and body definitely got involved. Part of it is that my education and training were as a professional philosopher. There were hundreds of books and many paths gone through.

For about five years, I kept one question constantly in mind (whenever the mind wasn't engaged in what was before it), because I **REALLY** wanted to know the answer: what IS this choosing, willing entity? One day while I was reading a book by Ramesh Balsekar, standing on the Grand Central Station subway platform, the answer came by way of the world imploding and my phenomenal self expanding, disappearing to merge with it. No separate independent entity was seen anywhere. All "willings," "desirings," "thoughts," etc., were seen deeply as spontaneous arisings in consciousness happening around no fixed point or location. Not only the entity "Greg," but also all personal entities dissolved, became appearances in consciousness.

Lightness, sweetness, brightness, and a certain fluidity of the world followed immediately as sensory qualities of everything, and became one with all experiences. There were psychological aftereffects as well, like more resiliency, more psychological peace and happiness. At the time, it was really a non-event. Even now, it's not something I ever noticed or thought about at the time, unless I'm asked and then try to reconstruct it.

I do remember that people at work noticed, my friends and parents noticed. I didn't have a real good intellectual understanding of it at the time, and didn't seek one. I'd never met anyone else to talk to about this.

This came at the "right" time too, because I was just going through a break-up with a beautiful transsexual lady who looked like Naomi Campbell, but who was monogamously challenged. It was not difficult, where years previously it would have been painful. We are now very close friends. :-)

Then more attending. Another several-year constant inquiry, but very light, almost with an aesthetic, playful, artful, no-big-deal appeal. This time the inquiry was on the dualism between the appearances and the background consciousness that the appearances appear to -- it was that simple. By this time I knew lots of other people, satsang teachers, etc.

I could sincerely say that "I am the background, because the appearances appear to me," that was clear. I never ever ever felt like I was a mind or a body or a thought or a feeling of contraction in the chest or forehead.

But I didn't understand it. Why should the appearances that rise up out of consciousness seem like something other than consciousness? This continued for two years, constantly arising (but no longer taken as "my thoughts, my inquiry") -- it just happened. Then one day, sitting at home reading a book by Krishna Menon given to me by Francis Lucille, the whole thing imploded.

The telescope collapsed. There was a burning savikalpa samadhi for 90 minutes. It went away. Then the object/subject, appearance/background thing just collapsed.

No separation or gap or dichotomy was seen anywhere, then or since. No union or wholeness has been seen either. No questions, no answers. All is unbroken, continuous, was never different. The light, love and sweetness from before were no longer part of discrete appearances as it seemed to be years before, but rather the source and substance of objectless knowledge itself. Talk of subjects or objects or appearances (or anything) became a kind of enjoyable make-believe, helpful perhaps in speaking with other people, but that was it.

What do I do? If I had to come up with a word, it would be celebrate. It looks like this. Work, ride a bike, lift weights, eat, I'm dating a new lady, I write email, have satsang with friends, visit Francis Lucille, a beloved teacher, who gave me the Krishna Menon book (he counts Krishna Menon and Jean Klein among his teachers, too). I was invited to teach this same kind of stuff at the yoga center of friends in New York City's Soho, who also love Francis. I am trying to learn to dance-skate, but am often lazy. I am trying to learn more compassion and kindness. For this reason, and for the beauty and simplicity, I practice Shin Buddhism at a temple in New York.



Greg Goode, Ph.D., is editor of the Nondualism and Western Philosophers page of Nonduality Salon. Selections from his writings appear on his webpage, No Presence, No Absence.



This article appeared as a letter on the Nonduality Salon mailing list on December 9, 1999.
It was published here on January 11, 2000 and last revised on May 13, 2000.


Copyright 2001 Realization.org. All rights reserved.